Creating a Customer Avatar

Why we need to do this …

We do this for a number of good reasons:

  • It’s essential to have an image of who we are talking to when we design our products and marketing messages.
  • Knowing their interests helps us find and target them more cost effectively

How we are going to do this …

  • We divide our target market into segments. We can do this in a number of ways:
    • How good/skilled/experienced they are
    • What their appetite and budget is 
    • What their desired outcome is
  • For each one, create an avatar using the questions below. 

Section 1: Demographics

  • Name:
  • Age:
  • Gender:
  • Marital status:
  • Age and # of children:
  • Location:
  • Field of occupation:
  • Job title:
  • Annual income:
  • Education level:

Section 2: Challenges & Pain Points

  • What are this customer’s top 3 challenges?
  • What are this customer’s top 3 pain points?
  • What is your customer not good at?
  • What is your customer uncertain about?
  • What does your customer no longer want to experience?
  • What does your customer no longer want to feel?
  • What does your customer have bad dreams about?

Section 3: Goals, Desires and Values

  • What are this customer’s top 3 goals?
  • What are this customer’s top values?
  • What are they committed to? What do they believe in?
  • What they want to get better at?
  • What do they want to experience?
  • What do they want to feel?
  • What does your customer have pleasant / daydreams about?

Section 4: Sources of Information

  • What books does your customer read (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What magazines does your customer subscribe to (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What blogs and websites does your customer visit (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • Which conferences and events as your customer attend (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What experts does your customer follow (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What other interests or activities as your customer have or do (which other people would be unlikely to)?

Section 5: Buying Behaviour

  • What objections would your customer be likely to have?
  • What role does the customer have in the purchase process?
  • Who else would be likely to influence the customer in terms of buying?
  • How comfortable is the customer likely to be at buying online versus face-to-face or over the phone?

Section 6: Outcomes & Alternatives

  • What transformation is the customer looking for (from and to what):
  • How would they visualise that transformation? (Where would they be and what would they be doing?)
  • What alternatives do they have to our solution, and why don’t they give the same result?

Section 7: Context of Problem or Need

  • How or when do they discover they have a need?
  • Who do they first discuss solving this problem with?
  • Where do they usually do their research to solve this problem?
  • Where do they look to find companies to solve this problem?

Creating a Business Idea Shortlist

What we’re going to do in this tutorial …

We are going to come up with ideas about services you can provide, and look at who is likely to pay you the most money, and give you the most joy to work with. Just like personal relationships, business works best when both partners are fully engaged, enthusiastic and appreciative. So we’re going to find your ideal partner from a business perspective. 

Why we need to do this …

When searching for a business idea, many people look at what other people are doing. 

It’s not a bad idea – it’s important to know if there’s already a successful business doing the things you want to do, because it means there is a market for it. 

And you have a model to work from when building your own business.

But the person who started that business may well have very different skills and abilities to yours, different strengths and experience levels.

So whilst the business they are running might be the best thing for them to be doing, it might not be the best thing for you.

Rather than “what kind of business should I run?” there is a better question to be asking:

“Given my skills, passions and experience, what group of people can I profitably add the most value to?”

This group needs to be made of people you can resonate with, because it’s very hard to to design a business around people whose key drivers you have no grasp of.

And surviving in business is about finding better ways to profitably serve your customers than the competition does.

It’s how you get people to choose to buy from you.

There’s a saying: you can have anything you want providing you help enough people get what they want.

Your income as a business is essentially the product of how many people you help multiplied by how grateful they are for that help.

How we are going to do this …

  • For the groups of people you know about, look at ideas that will live in the overlap of the three circles above.
  • For each idea that you think has potential, list it in the table below, noting who it serves, and what value you think it adds to them and to you on a scale of 1-10

Defining Your Mission

Part 1 – Create your vision

We are going to have a go at working out what your overall vision is, which is a shared purpose that inspires you and gives a reason and purpose to what you do beyond pennies in bank accounts.

Why we need to do this …

People keep going longer and put up with more when they have a good why. Running a business will have its ups and downs, and the more durability we can give you the better. 

Having a vision will also give you a different perspective when choosing which business ideas to go for.

But your vision is not just for you. It should also inspire and unite the people working with you. It should be an engagement tool for clients, so they get to see you as a force for good as opposed to simply another money-making machine, which helps to create raving fans.

How we are going to do this …

  • Technically, you just need to write down what your vision is, starting with Our vision is a place where …. (See the examples below to help you.)
  • However, your vision might not be very clear at the outset. You can equate it to your purpose if that helps.
  • TIP: Imagine if you woke up with £100,000,000,000 in your bank tomorrow. After a spate of holidays and purchases, what would you devote your life to doing? Who would you serve, and why?
  • Don’t be afraid to create a pencil sketch version now and come back to this at a later date. It can take many years to discover it fully. But having something is better than nothing.

Some examples to help you …

  • Google: our vision is a place where people have access to the information they need anywhere at any time
  • Apple: our vision is a place where people are able to achieve amazing lives thanks to intuitively and beautifully designed devices and systems.
  • AgileOS: our vision is a place where people have the frameworks and systems to define and deliver their own personal vision of success
  • The Performance Partnership: our vision is a place where people have the tools and techniques to make the impossible possible

 

Part 2 – Define your mission

We are going to define your mission, which is an expression of one of the ways we are going to make your vision a reality.  (You can think of a mission as being a business idea.)

Why we need to do this …

We do this because it’s a very useful way of chunking down our thinking about what we are doing into focused units.

The right level to think of a mission is as a division within a group, just in the same way that Apple is divided into music technology, telephone technology, computer technology et cetera.

It’s fine to start off with just one mission. Google started with just a search engine. Amazon started with just a bookstore. Apple started with just a computer.

Not all of the missions have to be moneymaking. Some people have one commercial mission, and one contribution mission.

Take us here at AgileOS as an example. We have two missions. One is a commercial mission, doing what we doing right now, which is helping people design and build a business. 

The other one is our DeliverAid initiative, which is a contribution mission where we take computers and educational supplies to disadvantaged children in impoverished areas using some of the profits we create by doing a commercial mission.

But having those two things divided down into separate missions really helps us think properly.

How we are going to do this …

  • Write down your mission, starting with We are going to … (You can use the examples below if you want inspiration.)
  • If you aren’t sure what your mission should be, try our Creating your Business Idea Shortlist tutorial.
  • If you have a number of ideas that you can’t decide between, try our Evaluating your Business Idea tutorial.

Some examples to help you

  • Google: We are going to reinvent the way that people navigate and explore by creating Google Earth
  • Apple: We are going to reinvent the way that people listen to music by inventing the iPod and iTunes store.
  • AgileOS: We are going to give people the systems and blueprints to start and build great businesses.
  • The Performance Partnership: We are going to combine the best in personal development technologies (NLP, Time line therapy, Huna) et cetera to create training programs that achieve real transformational change)